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Taganga and Tayrona

More fun in the sun

sunny 0 °C

So after the stunning Playa Blanca beach we decided that we definately needed to see more of Colombias carribean coast, and so headed northeast over to the fishing village of Taganga, near Santa Marta. We arrived late at night in Taganga and headed straight on to Tayrona national park the next morning, so didnt really see much of the town until we got back from the park.
Tayrona park itself is a giant coastal rainforest, which conceals some pretty amazing beaches. Upon entering the park we had to wait a few minutes for a minibus to take us further into the jungle where the trail heads begin, so we sat watching a load of iguanas climbing in the trees till we left. Once we were dropped off we started the trek up to the first set of beaches, but shortly after starting a huge thunderstorm rolled in and we ended up spending ages navigating our way around giant mud puddles. An hour later we arrived soaked with sweat and rainwater at the first beach, a huge stretch of sand peppered with giant boulders, which was pretty cool- the storm gave it a eerie misty sort of look too, which made for a nice photo.

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We were dying to cool off in the sea, despite the rainstorm, but there were signs all along the beach telling us that hundreds of people had died along this stretch of beach because of rip-currents, so decided to keep going until the next set of beaches.
After walking along the coast for a while we made it to a cool little beach called la piscina, or ´the swimming pool´, which is a little cove sectioned off from the ocean by a load of partially sumberged rocks- by this time though the walk had taken us longer than we had expected and we wanted to get to a beach called ´El Cabo´ to meet some friends before it got dark, so we pressed on.
We finally arrived and got sorted with (expensive) hammocks in a little hut at the beach, where we met up with the australian couple we had spent Sadies birthday with, spending the rest of the evening watching the storm with some beers.

The next day was perfect weather and we spent all of it chilling on the awesome beach and swimming in the sea, that was peppered with shiny gold algae- giving it a really cool shimmering effect. The beach was pretty much my idea of a perfect beach, blue sea, golden sand, palm trees everywhere, and dense rainforest just behind the sand.

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That evening another massive electrical storm rolled in and we all sat there drinking, trying to get good photos of lightning, and trying to catch giant frogs.

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The next day we all trekked back through the jungle, having a lot of trouble getting around the mud left from the night before, stopped for an awesome fish lunch, and eventually made it back and met up for dinner in Taganga. We had a pretty cool night out, back in town where we ate the best steaks ever at about 4 quid a pop, took full advantage of 2 for 1 coctails and then went to a few bars- one of which was a open air rooftop nightclub.

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In the morning we spent some time exploring Taganga, which was actually pretty nice, with lots of fishing boats bobbing about, even though there wasnt really much of a beach, and the sea front was pretty touristy.

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We had planned on setting up a trek to Ciudad Perdida or ´the lost city´, which is a 6 day trek through the jungle to reach a really old set of ruins only discovered about 30 years ago. The problem was we couldnt be bothered; the heat on the coast was overwhelming, we had already done our fair share of jungle treks, and the thought of spending a whole week getting soaking wet and eaten alive by mossies wasnt our idea of fun at this point in our trip. So instead we decided to head back to cartagena and try and make our way into Venezuela.

Posted by St Martins 09:57 Archived in Colombia

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